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Vegetables in Aspic

Note Commerical gelatine and aspic powders are made from the bones of animals and fish.
Vegetarians who prefer not to use them can set foods in carageen or Irish moss, an edible seaweed available in powder form from health food shops.
Another vegetable substitute for gelatine is agar-agar. Like gelatine, caregeen and agar-agar come in varying strengths and you should follow the instructions on the pack when making them up.
Neither imparts a taste to the finished dish.

ingredients

serves 6
300 ml (10 fl oz) aspic or equivalent (see Note)
150 g (6 oz) peeled and diced carrot
150 g (6 oz) trimmed and sliced green beans
15 ml (1 tbsp) walnut oil
75 g (3 oz) sliced buttom mushrooms
15 g (1 tbsp) stuffed olives, sliced
150 ml (1/4 pt) thick Mayonnaise

method

1. Prepare the aspic or equivalent and allow it to cool.

2. Chill a mould. Wet the mould and when the aspic is almost set, line the mould with some of it. Put in the fridge to set.

3. Meanwhile cook the carrot and green beans in salted water until tender.

4. Refresh in cold water. Heat the walnut oil in a pan and gently saute the mushrooms. Allow to cool.

5. Mix the vegetables together with the olives, mayonnaise and the remaining aspic, remelted, then cooked almost to setting point, and fill the mould. Chill until set.

6. To serve, dip the mould into hot water, turn out onto a plate and cut into wedges.

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